Roman wine was slightly SPICY with aromas of toasted bread and walnuts
Briefly

Researchers from Ghent University analyzed Roman dolia, clay jars used for winemaking, to determine the taste of Roman wine. They found that the wine had a slightly spicy flavor with aromas of toasted bread and walnuts. The narrow base of the dolia prevented grape solids from having too much contact with the wine, increasing its longevity and resulting in a beautiful orange color. Burying the dolia in the ground helped control the temperature and pH of the wine, creating a spicy flavor and aromas of toasted bread and walnuts.
'No study has yet scrutinised the role of these earthenware vessels in Roman winemaking and their impact on the look, smell and taste of ancient wines', the authors, led by Dr Dimitri Van Limbergen, said.
The shape and storage of the clay jars, called dolia, influenced the taste of Roman wine. The narrow base of the vessel prevented grape solids from having too much contact with the wine as it aged, resulting in a longer lifespan and a beautiful orange color. Burying the dolia in the ground allowed the Romans to control the temperature and pH of the wine, facilitating the formation of surface yeasts and a chemical compound called sotolon. This gave the wine a slightly spicy flavor and aromas of toasted bread and walnuts.
Their analysis suggests that several factors influenced the Romans' wine, including the shape, material and storage of the vessel.
Read at Mail Online
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