Why social media CEOs deny responsibility for teen mental health crisis
Briefly

Multiple studies have shown a correlation between excessive social media use by teenagers and increased likelihood of depression. According to Jean Twenge, author of iGen, the more hours a teen spends on social media, the more likely they are to experience depressive symptoms. However, social media CEOs deny this connection because it directly impacts their business model. Twenge explains that social media companies make money by keeping users engaged and addicted to their platforms, and admitting to the negative effects of social media on mental health would undermine their profitability.
the more hours a day a teen spends on social media, the more likely it is that they're going to be depressed,
Twenge argues that social media CEOs have a vested interest in denying the link between social media use and depression. She emphasizes that the business model of these platforms relies on attracting and retaining users, and admitting to the negative effects of excessive social media use would be detrimental to their bottom line. Despite the mounting evidence, social media companies continue to downplay the negative impact of their platforms on mental health.
because this is their business. This is how they make money.
Read at www.cnn.com
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