How California's storms are projected to become more extreme with climate change
Briefly

As human-caused climate change worsens, California is experiencing more intense and frequent extremes in its climate. The disruption of the Earth's climate is affecting the water cycle and influencing weather patterns, leading to changes in the storms that bring rain and snow to California. The increase in temperature allows the air to hold more moisture, resulting in more intense downpours and potentially stronger storms in the future. At the same time, atmospheric rivers, which are major storms that bring precipitation to California, are projected to become more potent and could become a dominant factor in the state's water supplies and flooding.
"In general, this allows the most intense downpours to get more intense, because there can be a greater amount of water vapor in the air," UCLA atmospheric scientist Karen McKinnon said. "However, it's not yet clear if we are seeing this signal in the Western U.S. and California, although we do expect to see it in the future."
With the increasing temperatures caused by climate change, California is facing a future of more intense storms and potentially more severe droughts. The impact of climate change on the state's storms will have significant implications for future generations. As temperatures rise, the atmosphere can hold more moisture, leading to a greater potential for intense downpours. Additionally, atmospheric rivers, which are crucial for California's water supply, are projected to become more powerful. It is crucial to understand and adapt to these changes in order to mitigate the impacts on California's water resources and infrastructure.
Much of the precipitation in California and the West comes from major storms called atmospheric rivers that sweep in from the Pacific. Scientists have projected that atmospheric rivers will grow more potent as temperatures continue to rise, and will become an even more dominant driver of California's water supplies and flooding.
Read at Los Angeles Times
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