Media Briefing: How publishers are trying to get people to log in to their sites
Briefly

Publishers are focusing on audience authentication in 2024 to recreate demographic info and audience segments in a post-third-party cookie world. Maintaining authentication is a challenge with changing browsers or devices, as users may need to re-sign in to access their accounts and preserve their gathered information. Publishers are trying various methods to maintain authentication, such as reducing friction and increasing incentives for users to log in, or collecting personally identifiable information like IP addresses and device IDs.
"We don't believe there is really true first-party data beyond people that are logged in, because it's not just a third-party cookie going away, but all the browsers have also weakened the first-party cookie. It's very difficult for publishers to know that you're the same person that came back that was here seven days ago," said a media executive who spoke on the condition of anonymity.
To maintain authentication, publishers are focusing on one-step log-ins to increase the number of users who are perpetually logged in. For example, the goal is to increase the share of perpetually logged in users on both Safari and Chrome browsers from 5% to 10% for TVTropes.org. This ensures that a larger percentage of users are constantly authenticated and their gathered information is not lost when using different browsers or devices.
"One-step log-ins Justin Wohl, CRO of Salon, Snopes and TV Tropes, said that currently 5% of TVTropes.org's total 150 million monthly pageviews are perpetually logged in, meaning they've created an account with their email. But the goal this year is to increase that share to about 10% on both the Safari and Chrome browsers, which represent about 80% of the site's total pageviews."
Read at Digiday
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