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State of the Planet
1 month ago
OMG science

Solar Geoengineering To Cool the Planet: Is It Worth the Risks?

Respectable scientists and institutions are now pushing for more research into solar geoengineering to moderate global warming. [ more ]
Creative Bloq
3 months ago
Graphic design

Apple Car is dead, but AI has strange ideas for Amazon and Google vehicles

Tech giants like Amazon, Google, and Microsoft have shown interest in the electric vehicle market.
Companies like Leasing Options are using AI image generators to imagine what cars from tech giants would look like. [ more ]
Nytimes
11 months ago
Wellness

Why Do Mosquitoes Like Me So Much?

Credit... Tonje Thilesen for The New York Times

Ask Well
There are two main factors at play.Credit... Tonje Thilesen for The New York Times




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Q: I get bitten by mosquitoes way more often than my friends and family.Why is that?And is there anything I can do to make it stop?
KQED
1 year ago
OMG science

Gecko Grip: It's Atomic (Really) | KQED

www.scientificamerican.com
10 months ago
Science

What's the Faintest Star You Can See in the Sky?

One of the most obvious things about looking at stars in the sky is that they're not all the same brightness.
A handful are so bright that you can easily see them even in a big city's washed-out sky, while others are so faint that they're invisible unless you're stargazing on a moonless night from an essentially light-pollution-free locale (if you can find one).
This varying visibility of stars is so obvious you may not have given it much thought.
Astronomers, however, think about it a lot.
And astronomers, being scientists, decided they had to quantify it; in other words, throw math at it.
The first person we know did this was Greek polymath Hipparchus, who created a star map noting the brightness of various stars more than two millennia ago.
A few centuries later, another Greek astronomer, Ptolemy, attempted to classify stars using a six-tier scale, assigning the brightest stars to the first tier and the faintest ones to the sixth.
www.nytimes.com
11 months ago
Wellness

Can You Mix Booze and Exercise?

You're at brunch with friends, and mimosas are on the house.You're tempted, but you also want to go for a run later.What should you do?Will drinking doom your workout?Despite the popularity of boozy athletic events like Craft Brew Races and Bikes and Beers, exercise physiologists and nutrition experts strongly discourage drinking alcohol before, during or after exercise.
time.com
1 year ago
OMG science

Scientists Just Got A Step Closer to The Sci-Fi Reality of Building Solar Power Stations in Space

Hajimiri leads a component of a larger endeavor by Caltech researchers to develop technology that could gather the sun's energy in massive satellites orbiting Earth and beam it down to power the grid.
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Solar panels on Earth only work during the day, and they don't produce much power on cloudy days or when the sun is low in the evening or early morning.
In orbit, however, such panels would produce a constant stream of zero-emission power.
In space, it's always noon on a sunny day, says Hajimiri.
Codica
1 year ago
JavaScript

App Monetization Guide: Strategies and Tips

When it comes to building any app, its future monetization is one of the most popular things people tend to search for.
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The app monetization realm is packed with tiny nuances, different approaches, and various terms.
Creative Bloq
1 year ago
Graphic design

New Porsche logo: out with the old, in with the old

www.theguardian.com
1 year ago
Health

Can drugs fix the UK's adolescent obesity crisis?

GPs are seeing teenagers with high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol and type 2 diabetes conditions more commonly associated with late middle age.
Washington Post
1 year ago
Science

Scientists discover 'spectacular' undersea hydrothermal vents

Deep in the ocean, hydrothermal vents can tower up to 200 feet above the seafloor, belching out scalding water warmed by hot magma from underwater volcanoes.
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A recent expedition to locate more of these vents yielded a new find: a group of "black smoker" vents emitting water of 645 degrees Fahrenheit along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge near Puerto Rico.
Scientific American
1 year ago
Science

Most Planets in the Galaxy Orbit Stars You Can’t Even See

When I was younger, I gazed at the stars at night and wondered how many possessed planets like Earth.Being a Star Trek nerd, I couldn't help but imagine a universe where stars were fecund and planets were everywhere.But not knowing was agony.This story has a happy ending, though: Now we do know-the galaxy is filled with planets.
Futurism
1 year ago
Science

NASA Confirms That Cosmic Object Is so Bright That It Defies Laws of Physics

If you're looking for some of the brightest objects in the cosmos, squint no further than ultra-luminous x-ray sources, or ULXs.
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These loci of overwhelming luminosity have long puzzled astronomers because they at least appear to exceed what's known as the Eddington limit, which restricts how bright an object can be based on its mass, by up to 500 times.
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According to NASA, a marshmallow-sized object hitting such a star would release the energy of a thousand hydrogen bombs.
Scientific American
1 year ago
Science

Newfound Mathematical ‘Einstein’ Shape Creates a Never-Repeating Pattern

Creatively tiling a bathroom floor isn't just a stressful task for DIY home renovators.It is also one of the hardest problems in mathematics.For centuries, experts have been studying the special properties of tile shapes that can cover floors, kitchen backsplashes or infinitely large planes without leaving any gaps.
Inverse
1 year ago
Science

What Lies Beneath the Ice of Jupiter's Moons? Two Missions Will Investigate

Vulture
1 year ago
Music

Why Are My Secret Spotify Songs Following Me Around?

www.fastcompany.com
1 year ago
Artificial intelligence

AI redesigned the Starbucks logo, and the AI won

Ars Technica
1 year ago
OMG science

Space archaeologists are charting humanity's furthest frontier

New York Post
1 year ago
Artificial intelligence

Jesus, Cleopatra 'selfies' generated by AI go viral: 'Hilarious'

www.independent.co.uk
1 year ago
UK news

Ronnie Wood and Paul Costelloe among stars creating artworks for charity

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As part of the Incognito initiative, almost 3,000 pieces of postcard-sized original artwork will be sold in aid of the Jack and Jill Children's Foundation.
Scientific American
1 year ago
Science

Dinosaurs' Air Sacs Evolved Many Times and Let Them Take Over the World

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The researchers were surprised to find that the early dinosaur bones were more similar to those of alligators and deer than to those of the dinosaurs' later descendants."Prior to this study, it looked unlikely to me that invasive air sacs would have evolved three times independently" in separate dinosaur lineages, Aureliano says-but the new results suggest that scenario.
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Instead the study most likely indicates that air sacs invaded the bone multiple times independently, as the reptiles became larger and more diverse.
www.fastcompany.com
1 year ago
OMG science

NASA discovery reveals an intergalactic gamma-ray burst that could be the brightest of all time

In October, astronomers recorded a singular cosmic explosion across the universea pulse of gamma radiation so fantastic that NASA scientists have dubbed it the BOAT, or brightest of all time.
It was astonishing and consequential, and like most faraway whims of space and time whose existence finally make themselves known to our corner of the universeplanet Earthit was also far in the past, long gone from a fleeting moment.
The signal from the gamma-ray burst, now named GRB 221009A, had been racing through space for 1.9 billion years before reaching the fields of our telescopes.
New York Post
1 year ago
Public health

Three years on, NY leaders STILL not held to account for deadly COVID nursing-home order

Gov. Andrew Cuomo issued an executive order March 25, 2020, to move COVID-positive patients from hospitals into nursing homes.
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Thousands of unnecessary deaths followed his deadly decision.
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The order remained in place 60 days as his administration ignored protests from lawmakers watching the massacre play out.
www.independent.co.uk
1 year ago
UK news

Unseen McCartney photos from Beatles' early days unveiled ahead of gallery show

Wired
2 years ago
Science

A New Type of Aurora Found on Saturn Resolves a Planetary Mystery

TNW | Space
2 years ago
Science

Our next visits to Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, & Neptune are incredibly important

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If we launch during the next convenient launch windows of 2030-34 for Uranus and 2029-30 for Neptune, flight times would vary from 11 to 15 years.
HuffPost
1 year ago
Health

New Heart-Health Study Gives Reason To Drink Multiple Cups Of Coffee Per Day

If you're a one- coffee-per-day drinker, it may be time to up your intake.
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The roughly 12.5-year study, which was published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, explored the impact coffee had on the health of 449,563 adults age 40 to 69 with no history of cardiovascular issues.
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Coffee was found to help heart health and led to a reduced risk of death overall.
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People who drank four to five (not two to three) cups of ground or instant coffee each day saw a reduction in arrhythmias - and there was no reduction for people who drank decaf coffee.
Ars Technica
1 year ago
OMG science

Report pushes 'big-tent' approach for the future of batteries

www.vice.com
1 year ago
OMG science

Scientists Reveal How Tardigrades Can Survive Decades Without Water

To shed light on this superpower, researchers led by Akihiro Tanaka, a graduate student in biological sciences at the University of Tokyo, studied structures called cytoplasmic-abundant heat soluble (CAHS) proteins.
The team revealed that these proteins can form protective substances akin to gels that contribute to the exceptional physical stability in a dehydrated state seen in tardigrades, a finding that may have implications for human medical treatments and technologies, according to a study published in the journal PLOS Biology on Tuesday.
Although water is essential to all life we know of, some tardigrades can live without it potentially for decades, said Takekazu Kunieda, an associate professor at the University of Tokyo and the senior author of the study, in a statement.
Ars Technica
1 year ago
OMG science

Solving the rock-hard problem of nuclear waste disposal

Less narrative, more facts
Scientific American
1 year ago
Science

The New Normal for COVID Calls for a New Narrative

President Joe Biden's recent bout of COVID drew immediate comparisons with President Donald Trump's experience.
Stop polluting Mars
[ 2 replies ]
Futurism
1 year ago
Science

NASA Finally Figured Out What That Weird Spaghetti It Found on Mars Was

Zombie apocalypse incoming
[ 1 reply ]
Washington Post
1 year ago
Science

The pigs had been dead for an hour. Scientists made their hearts beat again.

Hours after pumping synthetic fluids through the bodies of dead pigs, a team of researchers from Yale University observed their hearts beginning to beat faintly.Blood circulation was restored, and some cellular functions were revived in vital organs such as the heart and liver.
EL PAIS English Edition
1 year ago
Science

James Webb telescope reveals spectacular image of Cartwheel Galaxy

Inverse
2 years ago
OMG science

Life on Mars: A critical tool in the search for aliens is delayed

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Some 3.8 billion years ago, at the same time as life was emerging on Earth, Mars was habitable too.There is evidence from orbiters and landers of water on the surface then - there would have been clouds, rain, and a thick atmosphere.There was also a global protective magnetic field and volcanos.This means Mars essentially had all the right ingredients for life - carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus, and sulfur.If life emerged there as it did on Earth, we were on a track to find it.
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My expectation is that 2028 is most likely for our mission, but it will require hard work.
New York Post
1 year ago
OMG science

Solar eruptions, flares could impact Earth, NASA says

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NASA says the sun has been very active, which is what could cause problems on Earth.
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Scientists from NASA have said that more solar activity, flares and eruptions are coming and that the solar cycle is not yet at its peak, but has already surpassed expectations.
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NASA predicts that solar eruptions and flares will continue to increase from now until 2025.
Probably because they don't watch the news 😄
time.com
1 year ago
OMG science

Why Animals Are Less Vulnerable Than Humans to BA.5 and Omicron

But there's good news: other research has found that the highly infectious Omicron variant and its multiple subvariants might hit animals less hard than they hit ustransmitting less easily among them and causing less severe disease.
New Scientist
1 year ago
OMG science

Blood substitute repairs damaged organs hours after heart stops

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"We have shown that cells don't die as quickly as we assumed they do, which opens up possibilities for intervention.We can persuade cells not to die," says Zvonimir Vrselja at Yale School of Medicine.
Interesting
Inverse
1 year ago
OMG science

Extraterrestrial life could resemble real ancient microbes found on Earth

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Maybe on Enceladus or Europa in our Solar System, or further away on an exoplanet?As we get more proficient at exploring our Solar System and studying exoplanets, the prospect of finding some simple life is moving out of the creative realm of science fiction and into concrete mission planning.
Inverse
1 year ago
OMG science

One of Interstellar's wildest concepts could help humans live on Moon

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These include radiation, as locations beyond Earth's protective magnetosphere are exposed to greater levels of solar and cosmic rays.
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If humanity's future truly lies in space, we must devise solutions to this issue in advance.
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