Regenerative Certifications Are Booming Right Now. Are They Worth It?
Briefly

Regenerative agriculture certifications, such as Regenified, have been rapidly gaining popularity in the beverage industry. Mendocino Wine Company recently announced that its estate vineyards received a Tier 3 Regenified certification, while Maker's Mark released its first Regenified barrel of bourbon. The documentary film Common Ground, which highlights the efforts of regenerative farmers, won an award at the Tribeca Film Festival. The increased interest in these certifications is leading to questions about the industry's shift towards regenerative farming and whether it is worthwhile.
The recently launched regenerative agriculture certification in particular has caught on like wildfire. In November, Mendocino Wine Company rolled out a press release announcing its estate vineyards had received a shiny new Tier 3 Regenified certification.
Regenerative agriculture has its roots in ancient traditions and Indigenous communities, but the term was coined by Robert Rodale in the early 1980s. It encompasses any farming practices that focus on environmental improvement and recognize the importance of healthy soil for food systems and the planet. Gabe Brown, the founder of Regenified, embraced regenerative agriculture in the 1990s after facing challenges on his family farm in North Dakota. The rise of regenerative agriculture certifications signals a growing interest in holistic farming practices that prioritize environmental sustainability and quality food production.
Though the roots of the regenerative movement trace back to Indigenous communities and other ancient traditions-farmers who listened to the land- Robert Rodale first coined the term 'regenerative agriculture' in the early '80s, referring to any type of farming that encourages environmental improvement.
Read at Wine Enthusiast
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