Nearly Half of the World's Migratory Species Are in Decline, U.N. Report Says
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Nearly half of the world's migratory species are in decline, according to a new UN report. Many migratory animals, such as songbirds, sea turtles, whales, and sharks, are imperiled by various threats including habitat loss and climate change. The report found that 44% of migratory species worldwide are declining in population, and over a fifth of the 1,200 species monitored by the UN are threatened with extinction. Migration is essential for some species, and cutting off their migration routes can lead to their demise.
Migration is essential for some species. If you cut the migration, you're going to kill the species, said Duke University ecologist Stuart Pimm.
At a UN wildlife conference, various conservation proposals are under evaluation, including adding two species of declining Amazon catfish to the UN treaty's list of migratory species of concern. The Amazon River basin, the world's largest freshwater system, plays a crucial role in the survival of these catfish. Susan Lieberman, vice president for international policy at the Wildlife Conservation Society, emphasized that saving these species requires collective action from multiple countries.
One country alone cannot save any of these species, said Susan Lieberman, vice president for international policy at the nonprofit Wildlife Conservation Society.
Read at time.com
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