NASA's Juno mission captures spectacular images of Jupiter's volcanic moon lo
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NASA's Juno mission passed within 930 miles of Jupiter's volcanic moon lo, capturing stunning images of its volcanic activity. The spacecraft has been studying the massive planet and its moons, including lo, and has recently captured the first-ever images of lo's north and south poles. Scientists are studying how lo's volcanoes vary and how its activity is connected to Jupiter's magnetosphere.
"By combining data from this flyby with our previous observations, the Juno science team is studying how Io's volcanoes vary," Juno's principal investigator Scott Bolton of the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio said.
Juno's mission also involves studying the importance of tidal forces from Jupiter on lo, which are constantly squeezing the moon. The spacecraft will have several more flybys of lo before the end of the mission. The JunoCam suffered radiation exposure during its last close pass of Jupiter, but engineers were able to fix the camera by using internal heaters to warm it up.
The spacecraft's JunoCam suffered radiation exposure during its last close pass of the planet, which was doctored by engineers who used internal heaters on the camera to warm it up.
Read at New York Post
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