Look! NASA Snapped A Rare Closeup of the Solar System's Most Terrifying Moon
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NASA's Juno spacecraft recently flew over the southern hemisphere of Jupiter's moon Io, capturing stunning images of volcanoes, lava lakes, and other geological features.
Last weekend, NASA's Juno spacecraft flew over the southern hemisphere of Jupiter's moon Io. The close flyby brought Juno within 930 miles of the sulfur-shrouded hellscape of volcanoes and lava lakes that make up Io's surface.
Io's volcanic activity is fueled by the gravitational interactions between Jupiter and its two other moons, Europa and Ganymede. These interactions create powerful tides within Io, generating enough heat to power the moon's rivers of lava beneath sulfurous plumes.
Their competing gravity creates powerful tides deep in Io's interior, stretching the moon's innards back and forth - and generating enough heat to power a world where rivers of lava flow beneath sulfurous plumes.
Read at Inverse
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