How to spot a bargain bottle of wine whether it's 7 or 40
Briefly

Valuing wine can be confusing as different sources may claim different prices and values for the same bottles. The correlation between price and production costs is not always clear, and factors such as vine yield and production methods can impact the quality of the wine. However, it is possible to find high-quality wines for a reasonable price, especially in unfashionable regions with lower land and labor costs.
Wine prices can sometimes be baffling. You can never be quite sure where you stand. I write this having just read a piece on 2019 Bordeaux that deems some bottles priced between 40 and 50 to be bargains, another that trumpets the cheapest price on the market for a 173.50 bottle of Dom Perignon, and another that says I need never pay more than 20 for the best quality wine around. They can't all be right, can they?
Factors such as vine yield, older vines, and grape quality can contribute to the cost of a wine. Production methods, such as hand-harvesting and the use of expensive equipment, can also increase costs. However, it is challenging to justify a bottle of wine costing significantly more than 25, as the costs of production, even with a generous margin for the producer, do not typically add up to a higher price. Cheaper wines that have gone through the same quality-driven steps can be found in unfashionable regions or places with lower costs.
But in truth, and even allowing for a generous margin for the producer, it's hard to make them come to a bottle costing much far north of 25. Certainly, it's possible to find a wine that has taken all those qualitative steps for that price or, in certain unfashionable places, with cheaper land and labour costs, for less. The complicating, confounding element is that no matter how meticulous your methods and how lavish your spending on them, the single most important factor in lifting a wine from good to great is
Read at www.theguardian.com
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