Protect Good Faith Security Research Globally in Proposed UN Cybercrime Treaty
Briefly

The UN Cybercrime Treaty drafts have raised concerns among the global security research community. These drafts pose risks to global cybersecurity and significantly impact the rights and activities of good faith cybersecurity researchers. The proposed treaty categorizes much of the work of security researchers as criminal activity, potentially leading to their prosecution and hindering their ability to enhance technological safety. It is crucial that legal frameworks support the efforts of security researchers to find and disclose technological weaknesses to make everyone more secure, rather than penalize them
These drafts pose substantial risks to global cybersecurity and significantly impact the rights and activities of good faith cybersecurity researchers.
Good faith security researchers play a critical role in safeguarding information technology systems by identifying vulnerabilities. However, the UN Cybercrime Treaty drafts risk hindering their work by categorizing it as criminal activity. This could lead to prosecution of security researchers, even when their goal is to enhance technological safety. It is important to differentiate legitimate security research activities from malicious exploitation of security flaws. Current laws on 'unauthorized access' can be misapplied to good faith security researchers, leading to unnecessary legal challenges
If adopted in its current form, the proposed treaty would increase the risk that good faith security researchers could face prosecution, even when our goal is to enhance technological safety and educate the public on cybersecurity matters.
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