Protect Good Faith Security Research Globally in Proposed UN Cybercrime Treaty
Briefly

The Electronic Frontier Foundation, along with 124 signatories, submitted a letter expressing concerns about the UN Cybercrime Treaty drafts. The letter states that the drafts pose risks to global cybersecurity and the rights of cybersecurity researchers. Current laws can be misapplied to good faith security researchers, hindering their vital work. The lack of clarity surrounding authorization rules and the requirement for prior authorization for each potential discovery are seen as obstacles to cybersecurity research. The proposed treaty's failure to exempt good faith security research and make safeguards and limitations mandatory could suppress security-related information sharing and undermine the safety and security of the digital environment.
We, the undersigned, representing a broad spectrum of the global security research community, write to express our serious concerns about the UN Cybercrime Treaty drafts released during the sixth session and the most recent one.
The proposed treaty's failure to exempt good faith security research from the expansive scope of its cybercrime prohibitions and to make the safeguards and limitations in Article 6-10 mandatory leaves the door wide open for states to suppress or control the flow of security-related information. This would undermine the universal benefit of openly shared cybersecurity knowledge, and ultimately the safety and security of the digital environment.
The proposed treaty's failure to exempt good faith security research from the expansive scope of its cybercrime prohibitions and to make the safeguards and limitations in Article 6-10 mandatory leaves the door wide open for states to suppress or control the flow of security-related information.
Read at Electronic Frontier Foundation
[
add
]
[
|
|
]
more Privacy professionals Briefly
[ Load more ]