PI submission on the impact of arms transfers on human rights
Briefly

Access to information laws and processes are crucial in uncovering details of states' capabilities and transfers in the military technology domain. They enable scrutiny by experts, civil society, oversight bodies and the wider public, sometimes culminating in a body of evidence for the pursuit of complaints and other accountability mechanisms - such as for PI's complaint to the European Ombudsman on EU surveillance transfers to third countries.
Access to information laws and processes are crucial in uncovering details of states' capabilities and transfers in the military technology domain.
Yet the various exemptions contained in access to information laws prevent, in our experience, disclosures of key pieces of information. These include blanket and qualified national security exemptions, exemptions for the maintenance of public order, prevention of crime or application of immigration controls, and those protecting commercial interests and intellectual property assets.
Yet the various exemptions contained in access to information laws prevent, in our experience, disclosures of key pieces of information.
Excessive delays and costly appeal processes also frustrate legitimate transparency efforts. Civil society organisations are regularly discouraged from pursuing accountability mechanisms because of such procedural frustrations. This is particularly true in the context of arms transfers, where national security and commercial interests exemptions are easily invoked and difficult to challenge.
Excessive delays and costly appeal processes also frustrate legitimate transparency efforts.
Read at Privacy International
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