New species of 65 million-year-old fossil shark discovered in Alabama
Briefly

Scientists have discovered a new species of shark, named Palaeohypotodus bizzocoi, that lived in Alabama 65 million years ago. The shark had unique fang-like teeth and was believed to be a main predator during the time when dinosaurs became extinct. The team uncovered 17 fossilized teeth that had been sitting in a Geological Survey in Wilcox County for over 100 years and realized that the remains were unlike anything on record - living or extinct.
'Having documented hundreds of fossil fish species over the last decade, I found it puzzling that these teeth were from a shark that I didn't recognize,' Ebersole said.
The researchers compared the fossil teeth to those of living sharks and found that they had a unique tooth arrangement that differed from any living shark. They also discovered that the teeth differed in shape depending on their placement in the tooth cavity. The tooth fossils provide important information about the extinct species and offer insights into ocean life recovery after major extinction events.
'By studying the jaws and teeth of living sharks, it allowed us to reconstruct the dentition of this ancient species and showed that it had a tooth arrangement that differed from any living shark,' said David Cicimurri, the Curator of Natural History.
Read at Mail Online
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