Life on Earth may have started when lightning hit volcano eruptions
Briefly

Scientists at Sorbonne University discovered that lightning from volcanic eruptions in ancient times emitted high levels of nitrogen, which played a crucial role in triggering the earliest lifeforms on Earth. Nitrogen combined with lightning strikes reacts with oxygen to produce nitrogen oxide, an essential element for creating an environment suitable for life to develop and sustain.
'Indeed, nitrate produced by storm lightning all around the world are spread out on the Earth's surface, while volcanic deposits are formed locally in a very short period of time and, according to our results, can contain large amounts of fixed N [nitrogen], a prerequisite for the development of life,' the scientists wrote in the study.
The study focused on three ancient volcanic sites in Turkey, Peru, and Italy, where samples revealed significant amounts of nitrates in the soil. The researchers concluded that these nitrates came from the atmosphere through lightning, rather than being produced by the volcano. Volcanic lightning is most common at the beginning of eruptions, occurring in ash clouds and the plume of volcanic smoke in the second layer of the Earth's atmosphere.
'When you look at the different possibilities, the most likely was volcanic lightning,' the study's lead author Slimane Bekki told NewScientist.
Read at Mail Online
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