Across the world, migrating animal populations are dwindling. Here's why
Briefly

A major new report by the United Nations has found that nearly half of the world's already threatened migratory species have declining populations. Over 20% of the nearly 1,200 migratory species monitored by the UN are threatened with extinction. Conservation efforts such as wildlife crossings, regulations, and habitat protections are helping some migratory species, but more needs to be done to reverse their population declines. The report highlights the importance of protecting the diverse range of species that embark on incredible journeys for survival and the need for stronger conservation efforts.
Nearly half of the world's already threatened migratory species have declining populations, and over 20% are threatened with extinction.
The report, compiled by conservation scientists, is the most comprehensive assessment of the world's migratory species ever carried out. It found that wildlife crossings have been effective in helping animals traverse over roads and fences, and regulations have helped prevent poaching and overconsumption of some threatened fish and mammals. Additionally, habitat protections have given species the space to move and prosper. However, the report's authors emphasize that these efforts need to be strengthened in order to reverse population declines and prevent further extinctions.
To reverse population declines though, the report's authors said, those 'efforts need to be strengthened and expanded upon.'
Read at www.npr.org
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