Research: 3 in 4 U.S. adults can discern real political news headlines from fake ones
Briefly

About 3 in 4 adults in the U.S. can discern real political news headlines from fake ones, according to a study conducted by researchers at MIT and Columbia University.
The findings are based on a dozen quizzes completed by a total of nearly 8,000 participants representative of the national population.
The study found that participants selected the real headlines 75% of the time, on average. Demographic factors, such as age and education level, were found to be stronger predictors of avoiding fake news than political partisanship.
Younger, less educated people are less likely to pick true headlines, compared with those who are older and have a bachelor's degree or higher.
The study's co-author, Charles Angelucci, stated that "the average person is very well capable of distinguishing mainstream real news," which challenges the media narrative that objective truth is dead.
"The average person is very well capable of distinguishing mainstream real news," says Angelucci.
Read at Nieman Lab
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