Educators, students get creative in evading book bans
Briefly

Educators and students are finding ways to access books that have been banned in states and schools, particularly in Republican-led states. Banned book clubs and community events are being organized to provide access to challenging materials. Some examples include the Authors Guild hosting a virtual book club featuring banned titles and students forming their own banned book clubs as after-school activities. Additionally, libraries, organizations, and communities are hosting events to give away banned books for free and foster community discussions about book bans. These initiatives are especially important for vulnerable communities who may not have easy access to books.
Christine Emeran, director of the Youth Free Expression Program for the National Coalition Against Censorship, said she has seen libraries, organizations and communities hosting events that give away banned books for free, community discussions on how book bans are happening and people participating in sit-ins at school board meetings and handing out books the board is trying to ban.
In addition to book clubs and events, these efforts provide access to information for students who may not have the means to purchase books or access public bookstores. By circumventing book bans, these initiatives are helping students in vulnerable communities, making banned books accessible and relevant to their lives.
Emeran says people overlook "how many students don't have transportation to be able to go to a public bookstore to purchase a book" and how useful these different tactics can be to giving out the books.
Read at The Hill
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